會員專區 會員登入
會員登記忘記密碼
尋找門市
The Dark Side 2 -- Day Zero and Other Stories
作者 Adrian Tilley
出版社 QX Publishing Co.
ISBN 9789622551343
分類 Literature & Fiction > Fiction > General Fiction
價格 HK$65.00
 
匯率只供參考
貨幣兌換參考
匯率只供參考
本網站未能顯示存貨,書籍資料僅供參考。
如欲查詢店存或選購,請致電或親臨門市了解更多。
 更多資料
【核心賣點】
創作背景設定在香港的12個恐怖驚慄短篇故事,讓讀者有更多身處其中的想像空間。
既能幫助讀者培養廣泛的閱讀興趣,又能提供提高英文寫作能力的範文。

【內容簡介】
The Dark Side 2: Day Zero and Other Stories is a mix of stories, dividing broadly between six’horror’ stories and six’thriller’ stories. Horror stories often fill us with dread and show us a much darker side of human behaviour. At the same time, they can be funny and satirical. The other six stories are more varied. Some are thrillers where the main aim is to excite the reader. Some like’Auto Message’ try to say something about how technology is affecting our daily lives. Others like’The Curse’ try to show us, in a humorous way, how greedy people could be.
The great thing about stories is that they carry us into another world on top of helping us to learn words, parts of speech and sentence construction. If we dive into the pool of good stories, we’ll learn how to swim – using those good examples in our own writing.


▋ 12個故事
- Day Zero 講述世界末日將至時會發生的恐怖事情
- Be Careful What you Wish For 講述主角從網絡收到特務組織的招募電郵,邀請他成為特務,他的任務竟然是要殺死自己的好友……
- The Curse 講述一張會說話的100元鈔票,以第一身角度說出自己的經歷,誰成為它的主人誰就會被咒詛……
- Doppelganger – the Double講述主角有一個跟自己一模一樣的替身,剛開始時很高興,但慢慢地替身開始做壞事,情況變得失控……


本書特色:

1) 全書包括12個短篇故事,有恐怖的,也有驚慄的,大部份以香港為背景。
2) 內容多樣化,透過故事探討一些現實主題,例如世界末日、網絡惡作劇變成悲劇、科技如何逼迫人類、現代人被奴役的悲哀及對未來的恐懼。


作者簡介:

Adrian Tilley taught English in the UK and Hong Kong before taking to writing full time. He has two young adult novels to his credit, The Spider's Web and The Damaged, Cheung Chau Paradise and Other Stories, The Dark Side and now The Dark Side 2 – Day Zero and Other Stories. He has written plays about Hong Kong's history and also writes screenplays. He specialises in creative writing workshops for young people internationally. He lives in a 400 year old barn in Devon, England. He plays golf and music, both rather badly.


Introduction

To Young Readers

Welcome to my third volume of short stories. The first, Cheung Chau Paradise, was stories about teenagers’ everyday lives in Hong Kong. The second, The Dark Side wasvarious horror stories, all set in the city with teenage central characters. This collection – The Dark Side 2 : Day Zero and Other Stories – is a mix of stories, dividing broadly between six’horror’ stories and six’thriller’ stories. Horror stories do what they state – they horrify us, fill us with dread, often of our worst fears (pain, death, loss and so on); they show us a much darker side of human behaviour. At the same time, they can be funny and satirical. Having been a teacher, I enjoy creating teacher characters who are ridiculous or sad or even mad. The rituals of school (assemblies, uniform, language) are often absurd and well worth laughing at by plunging them into bloody chaos. It is worth remembering that reallife horror is exposed to us every day in the media: accidents, wars, catastrophes. Horror stories may just prepare us to admit those real stories into our experience.

The other six stories are more varied. Some are thrillers where the main aim is to excite the reader, drive them on into the story wondering what will happen next. Some like’Auto Message’ try to say something about how technology is affecting our daily lives. The Pickers’ is very different in that it’s based on true events when, in 2004, 24 Chinese workers were drowned on the coast of England while working illegally. The story is both horrifying and sad and reminds us that the international slave trade still thrives to everyone’s shame.

Hong Kong is a great city to set stories in – it has an energy, a sense of order and a sense of chaos, that lends itself to stories. Look at how many films have used its unique settings to good effect. I hope my admiration for the place shines through and that perhaps the stories will open your eyes to what the city state is: diverse, exciting, full of promise and possibilities.

To Teachers

This collection of stories should appeal to young Asian readers as the characters and settings are (except in one case) all centred on Hong Kong. The English language content is challenging without being too obscure and is more accessible than much of the prescribed literature study on the exam lists. There are also serious issues addressed among the stories: modern slavery, the impact of technology on our lives, fears for the future of our security. Two of the stories are in play form and so should be useful for group/paired reading in class. I hope you will find the stories useful and they will lend themselves to interested reading and engaged responses to the texts.

To Parents

You can’t underestimate how important reading stories is in the development of language acquisition and intellectual development for your children. It has a dimension – a strength – that straight language learning cannot have. Learning words and parts of speech and sentence construction is only a small part of language. Engaging the imagination and finding language to express the ideas there, works on a different level of learning. There is also the bonus of working with idiomatic language – the everyday language – that offers a more’natural’ tone to English expression. The other great hing about stories is that they carry the reader into another world (however frightening or challenging or amusing that might be). The reader can experience things – extremes – in a safe way. When things get too scary, the book can always be closed. Reading stories is so rewarding. As Einstein said:’If you want your children to be intelligent, read them stories. If you want them to be very intelligent, read them more stories.’

Who can dispute Einstein on this?

A few tips on parental reading guidance (I write as a parent and a grandparent):

Read what your children read. Get to know what they like and why they might like it (even if you don’t!)

Read with them and to them. Even teens like having stories read to them.

Talk to them about what they’re reading. Get them to predict what they think the ending will be. How would the story be different if…

Encourage them to keep a record of all their reading – a journal or diary.

Encourage them to write in response to the stories.

Find other ways for them to respond to the stories. Drawings. Diagrams. Speech bubbles. Thought bubbles.

Make a video. Anything is possible.

Be good role models. Read yourselves so your children see it as an important activity.

Good luck! Happy reading!

Introduction

Day Zero

First Day at School

Be Careful What You Wish for

Auto Message

End of Term

Home for Dinner

Doppelganger – the Double

World Book Day

The Curse

The Pickers

Woofa the Dog

Thirteen Candles


本網站建議瀏覽環境: Chrome/Firefox/Internet Explorer 9.0+; 屏幕解像度1024x768或以上
©1999-2019 商務印書館(香港)網上書店有限公司 版權所有
放入暫存架